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Anticipating the Future of the Global Business Environment: Implications for Business Entrepreneurs

2nd International Conference on Entrepreneurship
Tehran, Iran

February 22. 2014

James L. Morrison

We live in an age of future shock. Changing values and lifestyles, changing global demographics, advances in technology (particularly in information technology and open technology), globalization with concomitant economic restructuring, climate change, the green movement, the Arab Spring, political instability, and regional conflicts mean that business entrepreneurs are faced with a rapidly changing business environment that most assuredly will be different from the present. The accelerating rate, magnitude, and complexity of change occurring in all sectors of global society have created vulnerabilities and opportunities across business environments. The purpose of this workshop session was to identify driving forces that can affect the future global business environment, their indicators, and their implications for business entrepreneurs. The "pump primer" introduction to this workshop and the group reports are available via video.


Disruptive Innovations in Higher Education:
Implications for the 21st Century Campus

Society for College and University Planning Southern Regional Conference
Atlanta, GA

October 20-22, 2013

James L. Morrison and Wendy Newstetter

The educational landscape is undergoing considerable upheaval due in large part to emerging developments in educational technology and pedagogical approaches. The rapid availability of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) from major universities within the last year or so, the emergence of competency-based degree programs and evaluation systems, flipped classrooms, mobile learning, and the shifting paradigm from lecture-based towards project and inquiry-based instruction pose challenges to college and university planners as they prepare their campuses for the future. This interactive plenary session focused on understanding these developments and exploring their implications for campus planning. The introduction and initial presentation, the conference participants’ responses to the implications of these disruptions for colleges and universities, and the concluding remarks are available via video.

 

Environmental Scanning

October 29. 2012

Public School Forum of North Carolina
Study Group XV
Education 24/7
Burroughs Wellcome Fund
Research Triangle Park, NC


James L. Morrison

The purpose of this presentation was to define and illustrate environmantal scanning as practiced in educational organizations and to provide suggestions for how small budget school systems could use this tool in their planning. A brief bibliography on environmental scanning is available here.

 

Emerging Disruptive Educational Innovations

July 27-29. 2012
WorldFuture 2012
World Future Society Annual Conference
Education Summit
Sheraton Centre Toronto

James L. Morrison

A “disruptive innovation” is a potential event that may change the future of educational practice. There are a number of disruptive innovations emerging in the contemporary educational landscape today in response to the demands of the global workplace (e.g., Western Governors University, Peer2Peer University, Khan Academy, ShowMe, the Independent Project, MITx, edX, Coursera, StraighterLine, MOOCs, Udacity, digital textbooks, flipped classrooms; see the "Open Educational Resources" page at the Horizon site's On-Ramp section). The purpose of this presentation was to stimulate discussion on how and why such innovations have the potential to dramatically change current educational practice. A video of the presentation is now available.

Accelerating the Paradigm Shift from Lecture-Centered to Technology-Enabled Active Learning Instructional Methods

July 27-29. 2012
WorldFuture 2012
World Future Society Annual Conference
Sheraton Centre Toronto

James L. Morrison

Employers around the world are expressing increasing dissatisfaction with the inability of high school and college graduates to access, evaluate, and communicate information; to use information technology (IT) tools effectively; to think creatively, to problem-solve, and to work well in teams and with people from different cultural backgrounds. A change of instructional paradigms--from passive to active (authentic) learning strategies, such as project-based learning, problem-based learning, or inquiry-based learning--is clearly needed. These strategies prepare students to step into the world of work fully prepared to do that work because throughout their course of study they actively practice developing the competencies that they will need to be successful in that work. But changing instructional paradigms is difficult. Faculty members are busy, many are not comfortable with using information technology (IT) tools, and most cling to the traditional model of the instructor as subject matter expert/authority whose task is to impart information. This interactive session focused on approaches to accelerating an instructional paradigm shift. The session rationale, agenda, and readings are available at http://horizon.unc.edu/projects/seminars/wfs.html, along with a mailing list that attendees can use to discuss the topic prior to and after the session.

 

Accelerating the Paradigm Shift from Lecture-Centered to Technology-Enabled Active Learning

June 1, 2012
Nanyang Technological University
Singapore


James L. Morrison

A vision described at a recent UNESCO Educational Leaders Forum stated that we should be using technology-enabled active learning strategies (e.g., project-based; inquiry-based methods) to improve student preparedness to enter the world of work. These strategies prepare students to step into that world because throughout their course of study they actively practice developing the competencies that they will need to be successful in that work. One of the primary barriers to implementing this vision, however, is a traditional faculty and organizational culture that relies on the lecture method as the primary instructional strategy. However, current approaches to broaden the instructional repertoires of faculty members include faculty workshops, summer leave, and individual consultations, but these approaches work only for those relatively few early adopter faculty members who seek out opportunities to broaden their instructional methods. This interactive session focuses on approaches to accelerating an instructional paradigm shift within an entire faculty. The session rationale, agenda, and readings are available at http://horizon.unc.edu/projects/seminars/ntu.html, along with a mailing list that attendees can use to discuss the topic prior to and after the session.

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For-Profit Colleges and the Future of Higher Education

May 23, 2012
North Carolina Public Radio Panel Discussion

The changing needs of today's workforce are transforming our system of higher education. For-profit colleges are an integral part of that change, but controversy plagues them, including worries about low graduation rates and the high volume of student loans for its students. How is higher education going to continue to transform in the future, and what role will for-profit colleges play?

 

Challenges Faced by Community College Leaders in Planning for the Future

November 18, 2011
Houston Community College Executive Speaker Series

James L. Morrison

We live in an age of future shock. Globalization, economic restructuring, advances in information technology, shifting demographics, the need for more (and differently) educated workers, including reskilling displaced workers, and increasing competition for traditional and emerging education providers means that community college leaders are faced with a future that will be different from the present. This interactive session focused on the results of an environmental scan that indicates how these forces might play out, the challenges that they pose for community college leaders, and how leaders at Houston Community College can address these challenges. A video of the session is available in four parts (Part I, Part II, Part III, and Part IV). Presentation slides are also available as is a post-session interview with Richard Schechter, Chairman, HCC Board of Trustees, on the future of higher education, Part I and Part II.

 

Further Thoughts on "Don't Lecture Me!"

April 14, 2011
Follow the Sun
Learning Futures Festival Online 2011

James L. Morrison

Employers around the world are increasingly concerned about the ability of the college graduates that they employ after graduation to think critically, to solve problems, to communicate effectively orally and in writing, to work in teams across cultural boundaries, to function creatively and innovatively, and to engage in continuous, independent learning. In order to develop these critical skills, pedagogical strategies in our institutions of higher learning need to change from lecture as the predominant pedagogical mode to technology-enabled active learning strategies like project-based, problem-based, inquiry-based modes. These strategies prepare students to step into the world of work fully prepared to do that work because throughout their course of study they actively practiced developing the competencies that they will need to be successful in that work. This presentation was part of a debate with Donald Clark ("Don't Lecture Me!") and Stephen Downes ("Long Live the Lecture!").

 

The Changing Landscape of American and Malaysian Higher Education

March 17, 2011
Universiti Malaysia Sarawak
Kuching, Malaysia

James L. Morrison

Higher education is in a major transition period that will fundamentally change the way colleges and universities around the world will conduct their business in the coming decades. In this presentation Professor Morrison described the major change drivers affecting global higher education and drew out the implications of these changes for American higher education. In partnership with the audience, he speculated on how/if these change drivers are affecting Malaysian higher education in a similar fashion. The presentation was based on an updated version of a speech Professor Morrison made at a World Future Society meeting titled, "The University is Dead! Long Live the University!"

 

Preparing Your Manuscript for Publication in High Impact Journals

March 18, 2011
Universiti Malaysia Sarawak
Kuching, Malaysia

James L. Morrison

Publication in high impact professional journals is critical to a successful academic career. Getting published, however, requires more than simply knowing your field or writing up a study. Understanding the process of publication from the editor's point of view, and making sure that your article meets the editor's basic expectations, enhances your chances of getting "Accept" or "Revise and Resubmit" letters, rather than rejection notes. What are editors' expectations? How do you avoid the pitfalls that bedevil inexperienced authors and sabotage their chances of receiving the coveted acceptance letter? James Morrison, founding editor of On the Horizon, The Technology Source, and Innovate, the Journal of Online Education, has been an editorial board member of seven other professional journals, and has published over 200 articles, 20 book chapters, and eight books. This is all by the way of saying that his presentation described the ropes for successful publication.

 

What Does It Take to Start an e-Journal?

March 18, 2011
Universiti Malaysia Sarawak
Kuching, Malaysia

James L. Morrison

Electronic journals are growing exponentially. Although similar to print publications, there are important differences. Professor Morrison, who served as founding editor of one print publication (On the Horizon) and two e-journals (The Technology Source and Innovate, the Journal of Online Education) described these differences as well as the pros and cons of each type of publication. His presentation focused on what is involved with starting an e-journal from scratch.

Implementing Technology-Enabled Active Learning Strategies in K-12 Education

Invited presentation at the 1st International Conference of TQM in K-12 Education: Best International Practices
January 8-11, 2011
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

James L. Morrison

One purpose of this conference was “. . . to try to prepare children not for the current world, but for a future one, a world with future developments that are still to be imagined.” Professor Morrison suggested that the competencies students would need to function effectively in this world include accessing, evaluating, and communicating information in teams across cultural lines using information technology tools and having a problem-solving mindset. He then argued that technology-enabled active learning strategies were best equipped to inclucate these competencies in students. The presentation then focused on these questions: (1) What do we mean by technology-enabled active learning strategies? (2) How do teachers using these strategies enable their students to be able to compete successfully locally and internationally? (3) What are the barriers to teachers adopting technology-enabled active learning strategies and (4) What can school systems do to encourage/assist teachers to use technology-enabled active learning strategies?

 

Faculty Resistance to Technology-Enhanced Active Learning: What Can E-Leaders Do?

January 7, 2011
Multimedia University Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
James L. Morrison

The 21st-century workplace demands a range of skills from workers. To function in this new context, college graduates must be able to access, evaluate, and communicate information; use information technology tools efficiently; and work with others effectively across cultural lines. Increasing concern that the traditional lecture method does not support the development of these competencies has led to calls for a change from passive to active (authentic) learning strategies, such as project-based learning, problem-based learning, or inquiry-based learning. In this presentation Professor Morrison argued that technology-enhanced active learning strategies are more effective in developing needed competencies in students and then, in keeping with the spirit of active learning, engaged the audience in exploring responses to these questions: (1) why do faculty members resist adopting these strategies and (2) what approaches can e-leaders take to broaden the instructional repertoires of faculty members to include active-learning instructional strategies. Presentation slides and the video (Part I and Part II) are now available.


Higher Education in Transition

Tan Sri Jeffrey Cheah Distinguished Speakers Series Lecture
January 3, 2011
Sunway University
Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
James L. Morrison

Higher education is in a major transition period that will fundamentally change the way colleges and universities will conduct their business in the coming decades. Although change in social institutions is seldom rapid, the combined forces of demography, globalization, economic restructuring, and information technology are forcing colleges to reconceptualize their markets, organizational structures, and pedagogical practices. This presentation focused on the impact of these forces on American and Malaysian higher education. The slides and the video (Part I, Part II, and Part III) of the session are now available.

 

Technology-Enhanced Active Learning Strategies (TEALS)

Invited Presentation at the International Christian University
January 12, 2010
Tokyo, Japan

James L. Morrison

The introduction to this session responded to these questions: (1) What do we mean by technology-enhanced active learning strategies? (2) Why are they important to improving instructional effectiveness? and (3) What are the barriers to faculty members adopting technology-enhanced active learning strategies? At this point, the audience was formed into four or five person small groups, and, after introductions, selected a group chair and a recorder/reporter. These groups focused on this question: What strategies do you recommend that the University employ to encourage faculty members to use technology-enhanced active learning strategies? The resulting group report-backs are available at Linkedin.

 

Addressing the Problem of Faculty Resistance to Using IT Tools in Active Learning Instructional Strategies

Invited Presentation at the Center for Research In Educational Testing
January 12, 2010
Tokyo, Japan

James L. Morrison

Employers are expressing increasing dissatisfaction with the ability of college graduates to access, evaluate, and communicate information; to use information technology (IT) tools effectively; and to work well within groups across cultural lines. A change of instructional paradigms--from passive to active (authentic) learning strategies, such as project-based learning, problem-based learning, or inquiry-based learning--is clearly needed.

However, changing instructional paradigms is difficult. Faculty members are busy, many are not comfortable with using information technology (IT) tools, and most cling to the traditional model of the professor as subject matter expert/authority. Although most professors now use one or more IT tools in their teaching, these tools too often serve only to support a traditional lecture method (e.g., PowerPoint, automatic class rolls, email, discussion forums). In a large survey in the United States, for example, Finkelstein, Seal, and Shuster, 1998, found that 76% of faculty across disciplines, institutions, and age cohorts use the lecture as their primary instructional method. A 2007-2008 UCLA Higher Education Research Institute study of some 22,562 faculty members at 372 four-year colleges and universities in the United States statistically adjusted to represent the total population of full-time faculty members at four-year institutions, found that the percentage of faculty members who extensively use lecturing had declined from 55% in 2005 to 46% in 2008. The authors speculate that this trend may continue as full professors retire (i.e., assistant professors were more likely to use small group instruction whereas full professors were more likely to lecture.) Although this trend is in the right direction, it is important to accelerate it as much as we can.

Current approaches to broaden the instructional repertoires of faculty members include faculty workshops, summer leave, and individual consultations, but these approaches work only for those relatively few early adopter faculty members who seek out opportunities to broaden their instructional methods. The major problem is how to affect organizational culture as a whole so that most faculty members will be receptive to adopting active learning methods and using IT tools to enhance these methods in their classes.

This presentation focused on the rationale and method of using a futures approach in addressing this issue. (See http://horizon.unc.edu/projects/seminars/ELME.html for references and an example of implementing the futures approach.) Also, there is a discussion of this issue in Linkedin.

 

Facilitating Technology-Enhanced Active Learning Instructional Strategies on Your Campus

Presentation sponsored by the Japan Association of Language Teaching
January 10, 2010
Tokyo, Japan

James L. Morrison

The introduction to this session focused on these questions: (1) What do we mean by technology-enhanced active learning strategies? (2) Why are they important to improving instructional effectiveness? At this point, the audience was formed into small groups, and, after introductions, selected a group chair and a recorder/reporter. The groups focused on these two questions: (1) What are the barriers to faculty members adopting technology-enhanced active learning strategies and (2) What can institutions do to encourage/assist faculty members to at least consider using technology-enhanced active learning strategies? There is a general discussion of this topic in Linkedin.

 

Faculty Resistance to Technology-Enhanced Active Learning Instructional Strategies: What Can E-Leaders Do?

Keynote at the 2010 E-Leader Singapore Conference
January 4-6, 2010
Singapore

James L. Morrison

This session addressed the following questions: (1) What do we mean by technology-enhanced active learning strategies? (2) Why are they important to improving instructional effectiveness? (3) What are the barriers e-leaders face in getting faculty members on board? and (4) What are strategies institutions can use for addressing the barriers.

 

Addressing the Problem of Faculty Resistance to Using Educational Media in Active Learning Instructional Strategies

Invited Session
ED Media 2009 World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia, & Telecommunications
June 22-26, 2009
Honolulu, HI

James L. Morrison

The 21st-century workplace will demand a range of skills from workers. To function in this new context, college graduates must be able to access, evaluate, and communicate information; use information technology tools effectively; and work with others across cultural lines. Increasing concern that the traditional lecture method does not support the development of these competencies has led to calls for a change from passive to active (authentic) learning strategies, such as project-based learning, problem-based learning, or inquiry-based learning. In this session Professor Morrison first argued that technology-enhanced active learning strategies are more effective in developing needed competencies in students and then, in keeping with the spirit of active learning, asked participants to form small groups to prepare responses to the following questions: (1) why do faculty members resist adopting these strategies and (2) what approaches can institutions take to broaden the instructional repertoires of faculty members to include active-learning instructional strategies. The results of this argument and these deliberations are available via audio and via the instructor slides and notes from the small group activity [search for "ED MEDIA 2009" in the Ideagora archive]. These notes are also available in the ongoing discussion of this topic in Ideagora's Linkedin group.

 

What Editors Expect

Invited Session
ED Media 2009 World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia, & Telecommunications
June 22-26, 2009
Honolulu, HI

James L. Morrison

Publication in professional journals is critical to a successful academic career. Getting published, however, requires more than simply knowing your field or writing up a study. Understanding the process of publication from the editor's point of view, and making sure that your article meets the editor's basic expectations, enhances your chances of getting "Accept" or "Revise and Resubmit" letters, rather than a rejection note. What are editors' expectations? How do you avoid the pitfalls that bedevil inexperienced authors and sabotage their chances of receiving the coveted acceptance letter? James Morrison, founding editor of On the Horizon, The Technology Source, and Innovate, has been an editorial board member of seven other professional journals, and has published over 200 articles, 20 book chapters, and eight books. This is all by the way of saying that he can show you the ropes for successful publication.

 

Speculations on the Future of Higher Education

Keynote at the iPED 2008 Conference
September 8-9, 2008
Coventry, UK


James L. Morrison

Higher education is in the midst of a major transition that will fundamentally change the way colleges and universities conduct their business in the coming decades.  Although change in social institutions is seldom rapid, the combined forces of demography, globalization, economic restructuring, and information technology are forcing institutions to reconceptualize their markets, organizational structures, and pedagogical practices. Professor Morrison describes these forces, projects how colleges and universities may have evolved by 2020, and outlines pertinent issues facing higher education in light of these potential developments.

 

Education 2018

Keynote Address
2008 Telecoop Conference
April 15-18, 2008
Breckenridge, CO

James L. Morrison

What will the educational landscape look like in 2018? How will educational organizations be structured? How will they define their markets? How will teachers teach? What will be the role of information technology? What are the forces driving these changes? What do they mean for the education of our people, young and old? How can educators help them thrive in this new world? How can we assist our colleagues accommodate and thrive? Professor Morrison address these questions in his keynote presentation.

This presentation was replicated on April 18th at the University of Georgia's Institute of Higher Education, which was followed by a 20 minute interview focusing on technology-enhanced active learning.

 

Towards a Practical and Sustainable Ed- Tech Paradigm: A Futurist Perspective

Innovation 2008
April 14-15, 2008
Breckenridge, CO
James L. Morrison

Education is in the midst of a major transition that will fundamentally change the way educational organizations conduct their business in the coming decades. Although change in social institutions is seldom rapid, the combined forces of demography, globalization, economic restructuring, and information technology are forcing educational organizations to reconceptualize their markets, organizational structures, and pedagogical practices. This presentation focuses on these forces and projects how educational organizations may have evolved in 2020. In addition, Morrison described a futures approach to organization and faculty development that educational leaders can use to engage faculty members in thinking about the future and its implications for their schools, their students, and their careers.

This presentation is based on an article published in The Futures Research Quarterly and on a workshop titled "Using a Futures Approach to Organizational and Instructional Development." An audio interview about the presentation is available here.

 

Higher Education in Transition: Lessons from the American Experience

Sponsored by
The School of Continuing Education
The American University in Cairo
March 4, 2007
James L. Morrison

This presentation is based upon an article published by Professor Morrison in On the Horizon, where he argues that U.S. higher education is in a major transition period that will fundamentally change the way American colleges and universities will conduct their business in the coming decades. Although change in social institutions is seldom rapid, the combined forces of demography, globalization, economic restructuring, and information technology are forcing US institutions to reconceptualize their markets, organizational structures, and pedagogical practices.

 


 




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